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Career Coaching

The Coaching Pyramid

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The Coaching Pyramid

The pyramid is one way to look at the coaching activities that offer some insights into the profile of those being coached.

Why is coaching a worthwhile activity with high popularity as a profession?

Many want to do it and some do it so well that their services are in high demand that people are willing to subject themselves to a level of vulnerability that they would only do with a doctor in normal circumstances. Why do we share our feelings with a stranger with someone we address with the title of Dr?

I speculate there are three reasons.

The person is a doctor which is a recognised credential from recognised medical institutions.

We are in pains and discomfort that are unbearable or make us fearful that our conditions may not improve or get worst if not addressed.

We want relief.

There is no far-fetched claim that coaches are doctors. The comparison is useful when it is used to highlight that coaches don’t focus on themselves but on the persons they are coaching. The main difference is that coaching relies on self-diagnosis and personal accountability from the people they coach. There are no thermometers to inform of high temperatures. No x-ray machines to detect fractures. No ultra-sound equipment to show us the internals. No medicine or operating table.

The coaches lack the resources from industries like pharmaceuticals or government agencies that are well funded to produce “solutions” for the health problems of people who want help.

In the coaching profession, the only tool is the coaching session in which there are some dynamics in play. First, coaches must believe that people can solve their own problems. Second, the persons being coached must want to know their problems or at least be aware of their own ability to do something. Lastly, the persons being coached must want to take action.

The coaching pyramid depicts the two basic types of coaching sessions – professional coaching sessions and practice activities.

The professional sessions focus on the problems and outcomes for the client. The International Coach Federation (ICF) defines coaching as a formal relationship between a coach and a client. It is a relationship that involves confidentiality, ethical behaviours, and conversations with the sole purpose of empowering the client to take action in solving their problems.

The practice sessions are activities that prospective coaches use to practise and develop their coaching skills. There are the peer coaching sessions that the coach-instructors use to guide their students on the use of conversations and communication techniques in the development of a coaching tool kit.

During the early stage of a coach’s professional development, the accumulated hours of the coaching sessions are used to gain credentials from institutions that require a certain number of coaching hours in the issuing of different levels of credentials. For example, coaches must have 100 coaching hours to be eligible to apply for the Associate Certified Coach (ACC) credential and 500 hours for the Professional Certified Coach (PCC) recognition.

At the base of the coaching pyramid, we have many coaches who engage in Peer Coaching to develop their skills and gain experience to build up their coaching capabilities. This is an important and necessary part of a coach’s development journey.

Moving up from the base of the coaching pyramid, there are three types of coaching activities. Community Coaching is when the session is not a paid one. The coaches do it on the pro-bono basis. It is important to note that although there is no financial consideration, the professional standards of practice expected of the coaches remain. The clients in community coaching are people with real problems that require attention and solutions.

Further up the pyramid, we have an area that is best described as Sponsored Coaching – which is a situation where the coaching sessions are paid one and the payment are not from the clients but by sponsors who want to support people who may benefit from the coaching sessions by professionals.

At the apex of the coaching pyramid, we have what we describe here as Enterprise Coaching; which simply means that clients are people with the ability to pay for the services of professional coaches.

The professional levels of coaching – whether they are community, sponsored or enterprise in context, are where most coaches aspire to be doing. And coaching at these levels requires high standards of confidentiality, ethics and responsibility towards the people being coached.

To find out more information about the professional coaching journey, you may contact one of our career advisors at enquiry@careerexcellence.com.sg

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Career Switch

Follow These Steps To Switch Into A New Career In Singapore

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Follow These Steps To Switch Into A New Career In Singapore

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If you’re here, you probably thinking of a career switch – you may have found out that your passion lies elsewhere, your previous salary is too low or the industry you’re in is a sunset industry. It may even be a combination of all these factors.

Or you may have been retrenched.

Whatever the reason, switching your careers is actually more common in Singapore than you think. According to WSG’s figures as a proxy, making a mid-career switch is an increasingly popular trend. In 2016, there were about 1,300 PCP placements. In 2019, the number rose to almost 4,500.

So how do you get a new job? Whether you’re just starting to send out your job applications or months into your job search, follow the steps below to quickly land a job that you actually want.

1. Know what you want and manage your expectations

The most important question to ask yourself before you send out the next job application is this: Is this really the industry I’d like to be in?

The worst thing you can do is to enter another job and find that it does not match up to your expectations again. Other questions to ask yourself are the following: Is the job fulfilling? Are there future growth opportunities? Is the salary acceptable?

It’s also prudent to manage your expectations. Making a career switch is starting from square one all over again. The learning curve is steep and your salary will likely take a dive as well. A general rule of thumb is to have at least 6 months of your last income saved up before you do a career switch.

Do your research, be aware of the industry and make the leap.

2. Grow your skills and update your resume

“Why should I hire someone with no experience?”

This will likely be a common question in all your interviews. It’s true, why should the company take such a risk?

This is why you have to make yourself marketable and employable.

Start by identifying the skills (i.e. project management and leadership) that you currently possess and can be transferred to your new job or industry.

Next, be aware of the skill gaps and pick up the relevant skills needed in the field you’d like to work in. Learn to walk before you run. Start small and attend basic courses.

This will help you gain confidence in your ability to learn and become familiar with the industry you’d like to be in. Ways to do so include taking up courses and studying for a certification. The skill gaps will eventually get smaller and smaller.

Lastly, update your resume with all the new skills that you have picked up and the certifications you have earned.

3. Make use of your connections

You’d be surprised how much your friends and colleagues around you are willing to help. You just have to take the first step and ask.

They can endorse you for skills and leave testimonials on your LinkedIn profile that will maximise your appeal to potential new employers.

Word-of-mouth is a good way to spread the word about your job search. You will probably be amazed at your social network’s reach and willingness to help you.

4. Get a good career coach

A career coach helps you to connect your skills, personality, values and distinct interests to the job opportunities you’re searching for. He/She will be a mine of useful information.

If you’re chasing a new passion or still unsure which path to take, getting another perspective from a professional career coach is extremely helpful.

If you’re interested to hire a career coach in Singapore, here are some features of a good career coach to look out for.

5. Stay ahead of the job market today

Over the past 4 years, our team of 200 career coaches has completed over 500 successful job placements.

We care deeply about your career aspirations and aim to help you achieve your career goals. Our career coaches and industry mentors will guide you through your journey of making a career switch in Singapore.

Contact us today at 6694 1262 to find out more.

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Championing Career Excellence

Providing career development solutions to bridge the skills gap between PMETs and their new job roles in the digitalised world.

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